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July 4, 2011 No Comments

So You Think You Can Make Them Independent Contractors?

You may want to think twice about doing it!

The Internal Revenue Service has strict guidelines defining the difference between an Independent Contractor and an Employee.  It is estimated that over 3 million workers are illegally misclassified as Independent Contractors.  This is costing the Federal Government an estimated $300 Billion in tax revenue annually due to this misclassification.

100 New Agents to crack down on small businesses.

Earlier this year, President Obama agreed to fund an additional 100 IRS agents to assist in cracking down on the misclassification of workers.  It is estimated that this initiative will generate an additional $7 billion in revenue over the next decade for the US Government.  This audit will affect 6000 businesses.  Now is the time to evaluate your employment practices and ensure you have properly classified your workers.

Double Whammy – States join the Feds.

States are joining the feds in this initiative and are sharing information resulting from audits.  One governing agency conducting an audit can cause a domino effect on the offending business.

Cutting costs illegally.

Because of the economic times, businesses are looking for all ways to reduce cost.  Many companies are using outsourcing as a way to reduce payroll costs.  This is fine if done legally, however the numbers indicate many businesses are not following the IRS guidelines for proper classification.  Businesses can save as much as 30% of payroll costs by classifying workers as independent contractors.  This avoids paying payroll taxes, unemployment insurance and worker’s compensation payments.  With unemployment at an all-time high, many states have exhausted their unemployment pools and are resorting to assistance from the feds.

Test to determine if you are legal.

In the past the IRS used a “twenty factor” test to determine whether a worker was an Independent Contractor or an Employee.  In 2006, the test was fine tuned and was reduced to 11 main factors categorized into three main groups; behavioral control; financial control; and relationship of the parties.

Behavioral Control shows whether there is a right to direct or control how the worker does the work.  The worker is an employee when the business has the right to direct and control the worker.  The business does not have to actually direct or control the way the work is done – as long as the employer has the right to direct and control the work.  Examples are if the worker receives extensive instruction such as how, when or where to do the work, what tools or equipment to use, what assistants to help with the work or where to purchase supplies and services.  If these situations exist, the worker is an Employee.  If the business provides training on procedures or methods and that the work is to be done a certain way, the worker is more than likely an Employee.

Financial Control shows whether there is a right to direct or control the business part of the work.  If the worker has a significant investment in the work they do, they may be an Independent Contractor.  If they are not reimbursed for some or all business expenses, they may be an Independent Contractor.  If the worker has opportunity for profit or loss, this indicates there is a viable business and could indicate that the worker is an Independent Contractor.

Relationship of the Parties illustrates how the worker and the business perceive their relationship.  If the worker receives benefits such as insurance, paid time off or pension, the worker is an employee.  If a written contract exists showing the relationship between the business and worker, Independent Contractor status may be appropriate.

Employee Status

When a worker is classified as an employee, the business must withhold income tax, social security and medicare taxes.  The employer is also responsible for their share of social security, medicare as well as unemployment taxes.  Employees are issued a W-2 Wage & Tax Statement.

Independent Contractor

When a worker is classified as an Independent Contractor, the business is not required to deduct or pay any taxes on the worker’s behalf and issues a 1099-MISC, Miscellaneous Income report.  The Independent Contractor is responsible for all payroll taxes both their own income tax as well as the self-employment tax.

Need some advice?

For more information on worker classification, assistance with a determination or a checklist to determine the status of a worker, contact us today!

 

July 4, 2011 No Comments

Taking a hard-working employee for granted

This morning I had a conversation with a friend who is someone I greatly admire. She is married, mother of three, has a professional career, is active in her church, is involved in several professional organizations, is working on her graduate degree and manages to be a good friend at the same time. It got me thinking, how is it some people keep many balls in the air at one tine while others cannot even manage one simple task?

Now here’s the clincher. She told me today that her employer feels she is not giving the company her all. They have said that her days with them are numbered. They would not be disappointed if she were to leave the company.

In looking at her accomplishments she has created a department that did not exist prior to her joining the organization. She has managed to save the company hundreds of thousands of dollars in potential penalties and fines by bringing them in compliance. She has implemented several cost savings programs and has maintained existing programs, keeping the company competitive. In essence she has done what normally would have taken a huge staff to do all by herself. Why are they not happy with her?

You see she gets more done in a half a day than most people get done in a day and a half. Because she gets more done in a short amount of time the expectation is for her to do more. I understand this philosophy. We all have the expectation that no mater what you accomplish if there is time at a the end of the day, then you should do more. On the other hand, how many times have we heard “I am getting paid to do a job, not to work by the hour”. What is correct?

There needs to be a happy medium. When someone has a gift of getting way more done than others, it should be recognized. People should not be punished for excelling in what they do. I know I have been blessed with that gift. Although not necessary, it is nice to be recognized for it once in a while. A thank you, a kind word goes a long way. It makes you want to give more when you are shown appreciation. So I ask you, today, recognize someone who has that special gift. Let them know you appreciate them. Don’t make the same mistake my friend’s employer did. They are losing one heck of a great person.

 

Taking a hard-working employee for granted.

This morning I had a conversation with a friend who is someone I greatly admire. She is married, mother of three, has a professional career, is active in her church, is involved in several professional organizations, is working on her graduate degree and manages to be a good friend at the same time. It got me thinking, how is it some people keep many balls in the air at one tine while others cannot even manage one simple task?

Now here’s the clincher. She told me today that her employer feels she is not giving the company her all. They have said that her days with them are numbered. They would not be disappointed if she were to leave the company.

In looking at her accomplishments she has created a department that did not exist prior to her joining the organization. She has managed to save the company hundreds of thousands of dollars in potential penalties and fines by bringing them in compliance. She has implemented several cost savings programs and has maintained existing programs, keeping the company competitive. In essence she has done what normally would have taken a huge staff to do all by herself. Why are they not happy with her?

You see she gets more done in a half a day than most people get done in a day and a half. Because she gets more done in a short amount of time the expectation is for her to do more. I understand this philosophy. We all have the expectation that no mater what you accomplish if there is time at a the end of the day, then you should do more. On the other hand, how many times have we heard “I am getting paid to do a job, not to work by the hour”. What is correct?

There needs to be a happy medium. When someone has a gift of getting way more done than others, it should be recognized. People should not be punished for excelling in what they do. I know I have been blessed with that gift. Although not necessary, it is nice to be recognized for it once in a while. A thank you, a kind word goes a long way. It makes you want to give more when you are shown appreciation. So I ask you, today, recognize someone who has that special gift. Let them know you appreciate them. Don’t make the same mistake my friend’s employer did. They are losing one heck of a great person.

January 3, 2011 No Comments

New Year’s Resolution

My goal this year is to communicate more with my professional community. What better way than to keep current with my blogging, thus the title of this blog . . “New Year’s Resolution”. I am curious to hear what others are resolving to do as we enter a new year with a clean slate. I’d love to hear from you.

My first issue that I would like to address is to recognize the hardworking. Stay tuned for more.

November 19, 2010 No Comments

Finding the Perfect Hire: Traits are More Important Than KSAs!

I was talking the other day to a friend about a recent hire their company made.

There were several highly skilled, knowledgeable people in the running for the position.  This position had been filled several times over the past few years and management was willing to take extra time in the process in order to find the right person who was willing to make a long-term commitment to the organization.  Having gone through several people they did not want to make the same mistakes they had in the past.

They conducted group interviews to get feedback from several team members throughout the organization; they did extensive reference checks on the individuals’ backgrounds; they put scenarios before the candidates and asked them how they would handle each situation; they posed real-life issues in the organization and asked the candidates if they had any solutions they might suggest; they had senior management spend considerable time with each candidate.  Sounds like a good plan, right?

The process took many months to complete and they finally chose who they thought was the “perfect” person.  Well, guess again.

After two months things are not what they seemed to be during the interview process.  Although the person possessed the necessary knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs), the person does not possess the traits that would make them compatible with the rest of the team.  They have great ideas but their approach on how to implement change is not cutting it.  Staff is finding the individual abrasive, offensive and not considerate of others.  I am not saying that the individual needs to be “warm and fuzzy” but there should be some consideration for those who have been in the trenches, dealing with the battles without a leader.  Someone once said that the only one who likes change is a wet baby.  Well there are ways to handle change that can make it more palatable for those involved.  This person just doesn’t have what it takes to bring the team together.  Rather than rallying the troops, they are alienating them. 

This is a common mistake made in the hiring process.  Possessing the right traits and personality is so much more important than knowledge, skills and abilities.  Traits are not as easily learned as KSAs.  When looking for the right person, it is so important to look at the whole person and not just segments of their constitution.  In the case of my friend and their current situation, they are now “stuck” with another bad hire.  They need to cut their losses and move on.  I only hope they’ll listen to some sound advice before making the next move.

October 6, 2010 No Comments

So You Think You Can Make Them Independent Contractors?

You may want to think twice about doing it! 

The Internal Revenue Service has strict guidelines defining the difference between an Independent Contractor and an Employee.  It is estimated that over 3 million workers are illegally misclassified as Independent Contractors.  This is costing the Federal Government an estimated $300 Billion in tax revenue annually due to this misclassification. 

100 New Agents to crack down on small businesses. 

Earlier this year, President Obama agreed to fund an additional 100 IRS agents to assist in cracking down on the misclassification of workers.  It is estimated that this initiative will generate an additional $7 billion in revenue over the next decade for the US Government.  This audit will affect 6000 businesses.  Now is the time to evaluate your employment practices and ensure you have properly classified your workers.

Double Whammy – States join the Feds. 

States are joining the feds in this initiative and are sharing information resulting from audits.  One governing agency conducting an audit can cause a domino effect on the offending business.

Cutting costs illegally. 

Because of the economic times, businesses are looking for all ways to reduce cost.  Many companies are using outsourcing as a way to reduce payroll costs.  This is fine if done legally, however the numbers indicate many businesses are not following the IRS guidelines for proper classification.  Businesses can save as much as 30% of payroll costs by classifying workers as independent contractors.  This avoids paying payroll taxes, unemployment insurance and worker’s compensation payments.  With unemployment at an all-time high, many states have exhausted their unemployment pools and are resorting to assistance from the feds.

Test to determine if you are legal.

 In the past the IRS used a “twenty factor” test to determine whether a worker was an Independent Contractor or an Employee.  In 2006, the test was fine tuned and was reduced to 11 main factors categorized into three main groups; behavioral control; financial control; and relationship of the parties.

Behavioral Control shows whether there is a right to direct or control how the worker does the work.  The worker is an employee when the business has the right to direct and control the worker.  The business does not have to actually direct or control the way the work is done – as long as the employer has the right to direct and control the work.  Examples are if the worker receives extensive instruction such as how, when or where to do the work, what tools or equipment to use, what assistants to help with the work or where to purchase supplies and services.  If these situations exist, the worker is an Employee.  If the business provides training on procedures or methods and that the work is to be done a certain way, the worker is more than likely an Employee.

Financial Control shows whether there is a right to direct or control the business part of the work.  If the worker has a significant investment in the work they do, they may be an Independent Contractor.  If they are not reimbursed for some or all business expenses, they may be an Independent Contractor.  If the worker has opportunity for profit or loss, this indicates there is a viable business and could indicate that the worker is an Independent Contractor.

Relationship of the Parties illustrates how the worker and the business perceive their relationship.  If the worker receives benefits such as insurance, paid time off or pension, the worker is an employee.  If a written contract exists showing the relationship between the business and worker, Independent Contractor status may be appropriate.

Employee Status

When a worker is classified as an employee, the business must withhold income tax, social security and medicare taxes.  The employer is also responsible for their share of social security, medicare as well as unemployment taxes.  Employees are issued a W-2 Wage & Tax Statement.

Independent Contractor

When a worker is classified as an Independent Contractor, the business is not required to deduct or pay any taxes on the worker’s behalf and issues a 1099-MISC, Miscellaneous Income report.  The Independent Contractor is responsible for all payroll taxes both their own income tax as well as the self-employment tax.

Need some advice?

For more information on worker classification, assistance with a determination or a checklist to determine the status of a worker, contact Barbara Flynn, SPHR at People First Inc., www.peoplefirstinc.com.